Physio Cronulla

WOMEN'S HEALTH PHYSIO - SAFELY RETURNING TO EXERCISE AFTER PREGNANCY

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Although a lot of women are keen to get back their pre baby routine it is really important to make this return as safe as possible.  

Whether you have had a caesarian or vaginal delivery we recommend you starting your pelvic floor exercises along with light walking as soon as you feel comfortable.

6 week check with your Women's Health Physio

At 6 weeks you will have a follow up appointment with your Obstetrician or GP, after this we recommend having a 6 week check up with a Women's Health Physiotherapist who will check the integrity of your pelvic floor. This is to make sure you can get a contraction, as some women's pelvic floor can be inhibited after birth and they can struggle to contact their pelvic floor muscles. It will also involve assessing the position of your pelvic organs to make sure there is no prolapse, checking for a abdominal separation and deep core contraction. Following this we will be able to safely prescribe a postnatal exercise program for you to begin. 

What about returning to running or high intensity exercise?

Although every woman’s body recovers differently, we still recommend waiting a minimum of 12 weeks, as well as having no incontinence issues, no pain or no prolapse symptoms before participating in any outer abdominal exercises such as sit ups or any high intensity core work that increases your intra abdominal pressure. This intra abdominal pressures directly puts strain on your pelvic floor.

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Running is another hight impact exercise that places strain through these muscles and we recommend before beginning to run that your have your pelvic floor assessed and pass a pelvic floor stress test.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse - Women’s Health Physio

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Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Did you know? 

One in two women who have had a baby will experience prolapse at some stage in their life, that’s why it is so important to have an understanding of what it is and the symptoms experienced with prolapse.

 

What is pelvic organ prolapse? 

Pelvic organ prolapse is when one or more of the pelvic organs (bladder, uterus and bowel) slip down into the vagina causing a bulge or a heavy dragging feeling. Prolapse happens due to damage of the support structures of the pelvic floor including muscles, fascia or ligaments.

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What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of prolapse include:

  • Sensation or heaviness/dragging/buldge in the vagina

  • Incomplete emptying of your bladder/bowels

  • Discomfort in the lower abdomen

  • Recurrent urinary tract infections

  • Sexual discomfort

  • Incontinence

 

Prevention and management strategies

The good news is there is lots that can be done to prevent or manage prolapse. The pelvic floor acts as a sling supporting the pelvic organs, therefore pelvic floor strength training is one of the treatment options that can prevent or help alleviate symptoms of prolapse. 

The Pelvic Floor - Women's Health Physio Sutherland

How much do you know about your pelvic floor?

Recent studies have shown that 20% of women asked to contract their pelvic floor are actually contracting the wrong muscles.

Your Pelvic floor is a group of muscles and fascia which run from the front to the back of your pelvis. These muscles provide support to the bladder, uterus and bowel. 

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These muscles need to be able to cope with the growing of your uterus (and baby) during pregnancy. They also need to be able to stretch significantly during labour to allow for the birth of your baby.

Postnatally, the pelvic floor muscles need to be strong enough to be able to return to normal function of supporting your organs in daily activities and with time, strong enough to return to more strenuous activities such has running.  

Need to talk to someone about your pelvic floor? 

 

ACL INJURY - RETURNING TO SPORT WITHOUT SURGERY

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A subset of people who suffer an ACL rupture can successfully return to sport without surgery.

We refer to them as copers or responders.

How do we identify them and have a successful return to sport?

  1. Screen for suitability - this isn't for everyone
  2. Systematically rehab - progression is key
  3. Test against objective criteria with minimum standards